Curriculum Connections – Health and Physical Education, Social Studies and Language - Primary, Junior, Intermediate

Health and Physical Education
(http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/elementary/healthcurr18.pdf)

Goal #1 states:
(p.3)
Students will develop:
• the living skills needed to develop resilience and a secure identity and sense of self, through opportunities to learn adaptive, management, and coping skills, to practise communication skills, to learn how to build relationships and interact positively with others, and to learn how to use critical and creative thinking processes;

THE IMPORTANCE OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION IN THE CURRICULUM
(p.4)

The health and physical education curriculum helps students develop an understanding of what they need in order to make a commitment to lifelong healthy, active living and develop the capacity to live satisfying, productive lives. Healthy, active living benefits both individuals and society in many ways – for example, by increasing productivity and readiness for learning, improving morale, decreasing absenteeism, reducing health-care costs, decreasing anti-social behaviour such as bullying and violence, promoting safe and healthy relationships, and heightening personal satisfaction.

The Ministry of Education’s “Foundations for a Healthy School” (www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/ healthyschools/foundations.pdf) identifies four components that together represent a comprehensive approach to creating a healthy school. This approach ensures that students learn about healthy, active living in an environment that reinforces their learning through policies and programs that promote healthy, active living. The four components are as follows: • high-quality instruction and programs • a healthy physical environment • a supportive social environment • community partnerships

A Supportive Social Environment
(p.8)
A supportive social environment has a positive impact on students’ learning. Students are more able and more motivated to do well and achieve their full potential in schools that have a positive school climate and in which they feel safe and supported. “School climate” may be defined as the sum total of all the personal relationships within a school. When these relationships are founded in mutual acceptance and inclusion and are modelled by all, a culture of respect becomes the norm. Students, teachers, and parents can all benefit from a supportive social environment, and there are various practices that can foster such an environment – from formal measures (e.g., school policies, programs, and guidelines that promote inclusion and the removal of systemic barriers; bullying prevention, healthy foods, and anaphylaxis protocols; clubs and organized support groups) to informal behaviour (e.g., occurring within unstructured peer interaction or free play)

Some considerations for program planning:

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS AND HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(p.47) Teachers should ensure that all students – students of all cultures, abilities, genders, and sexual orientations – feel included and recognized in all activities and discussions.

(p.55) Every student is entitled to learn in a safe, caring environment, free from violence and harassment. Research has shown that students learn and achieve better in such environments. A safe and supportive social environment in a school is founded on healthy relationships – the relationships between students, between students and adults, and between adults. Healthy relationships are based on respect, caring, empathy, trust, and dignity, and thrive in an environment in which diversity is honoured and accepted. Healthy relationships do not tolerate abusive, controlling, violent, harassing, or inappropriate behaviours. To experience themselves as valued and connected members of an inclusive social environment, students need to be involved in healthy relationships with their peers, teachers, and other members of the school community.

(p.57) In an environment based on the principles of inclusive education, all students, parents,
and other members of the school community – regardless of ancestry, culture, ethnicity,
- interpersonal relationships are addressed throughout the curriculum which include finding respect for self and others, physical or intellectual ability, race, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, socio -economic status, or other similar factors – are welcomed, included, treated fairly, and respected. Diversity is valued, and all members of the school community feel safe, comfortable, and accepted. Every student is supported and inspired to succeed in a culture of high expectations for learning. In an inclusive education system, all students see themselves reflected in the curriculum, their physical surroundings, and the broader environment, so that they can feel engaged in and empowered by their learning experiences.

The above excerpts from the H & PE Curriculum provide overriding concepts for the teaching of Health and Physical Education. For specific expectations for each grade level, see the Healthy Living section for that grade.

Social Studies
(http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/elementary/sstudies18curr.pdf)

Heritage and Citizenship
Grade 1: Relationships, Rules, and Responsibilities
Grade 2: Traditions and Celebrations

Canada and World Connections
Grade 1: The Local Community
Grade 2: Features of Communities Around the World
Grade 3: Urban and Rural Communities

Antidiscrimination Education in Social Studies, History, and Geography
(p.17)

The social studies, history, and geography curriculum is designed to help students acquire the “habits of mind” essential in a complex democratic society characterized by rapid technological, economic, political, and social change. Students are expected to demonstrate an understanding of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of citizenship, as well as willingness to show respect, tolerance, and understanding towards individuals, groups, and cultures in the global community and respect and responsibility towards the environment. In social studies, history, and geography, students learn about the past and present contributions of a variety of people to the development of Canada and the world. The critical thinking and
research skills taught in social studies, history, and geography will strengthen students’ ability to recognize bias and stereotypes in contemporary as well as historical portrayals, viewpoints, representations, and images.The learning activities used to teach the curriculum should be inclusive in nature, and should reflect diverse points of view and experiences to enable students to become more sensitive to the experiences and perceptions of others. Students also learn that protecting human rights and taking a stand against racism and other expressions of hatred and discrimination are essential components of responsible citizenship.

Language
(http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/curriculum/elementary/language18currb.pdf)

Successful language learners:
(p.4)
• understand that language learning is a necessary, life-enhancing, reflective process;
• communicate – that is, read, listen, view, speak, write, and represent – effectively and with confidence;
• make meaningful connections between themselves, what they encounter in texts, and the world around them;
• think critically;
• understand that all texts advance a particular point of view that must be recognized, questioned, assessed, and evaluated;
• appreciate the cultural impact and aesthetic power of texts;
• use language to interact and connect with individuals and communities, for personal growth, and for active participation as world citizens

Reading activities should expose students to materials that reflect the diversity of Canadian and world culture.

ANTIDISCRIMINATION EDUCATION IN THE LANGUAGE PROGRAM
(p.28)

The implementation of antidiscrimination principles in education influences all aspects of school life. It promotes a school climate that encourages all students to work to high standards, affirms the worth of all students, and helps students strengthen their sense of identity and develop a positive self-image. It encourages staff and students alike to value and show respect for diversity in the school and the wider society. It requires schools to adopt measures to provide a safe environment for learning, free from harassment, violence, and expressions of hate. Antidiscrimination education encourages students to think critically about themselves and others in the world around them in order to promote fairness, healthy relationships, and active, responsible citizenship. Learning resources that reflect the broad range of students’ interests, backgrounds, cultures, and experiences are an important aspect of an inclusive language program. In such a program, stories contain heroes and protagonists of both sexes from a wide variety of racial and cultural backgrounds. Students are made aware of the historical, social, and cultural contexts for both the traditional and non-traditional gender and social roles represented in the materials they are studying. Teachers routinely use materials that reflect the diversity of Canadian and world cultures, including those of contemporary Aboriginal peoples, and make them available to students.

SOME CONSIDERATIONS FOR PROGRAM PLANNING
(p.28)

ANTIDISCRIMINATION EDUCATION IN THE LANGUAGE PROGRAM

The implementation of antidiscrimination principles in education influences all aspects of school life. It promotes a school climate that encourages all students to work to high standards, affirms the worth of all students, and helps students strengthen their sense of identity and develop a positive self-image. It encourages staff and students alike to value and show respect for diversity in the school and the wider society. It requires schools to adopt measures to provide a safe environment for learning, free from harassment, violence, and expressions of hate. Antidiscrimination education encourages students to think critically about themselves and others in the world around them in order to promote fairness, healthy relationships, and active, responsible citizenship.

Learning resources that reflect the broad range of students’ interests, backgrounds, cultures, and experiences are an important aspect of an inclusive language program. In such a program, stories contain heroes and protagonists of both sexes from a wide variety of racial and cultural backgrounds. Students are made aware of the historical, social, and cultural contexts for both the traditional and non-traditional gender and social roles represented in the materials they are studying. Teachers routinely use materials that reflect the diversity of Canadian and world cultures, including those of contemporary Aboriginal peoples, and make them available to students. In the primary classroom, myths, fables, fairytales, and legends from a variety of cultures may be explored. In later years, stories, novels, informational texts, and media works relating to the immigrant experience provide rich thematic material for study. Storybooks, novels, magazine and newspaper articles, television programs, and films all provide opportunities for students to explore issues of culture and diverse identities. … Critical thinking skills include the ability to identify perspectives, values, and issues; detect bias; and read for implicit as well as explicit meaning. In the context of antidiscrimination, critical literacy involves asking questions and challenging the status quo, and leads students to look at issues of power and justice in society. The language program empowers students by enabling them to express themselves and to speak out about issues that strongly affect them. In the language program, students develop the ability to detect negative bias and stereotypes in literary texts and informational materials; they also learn to use inclusive and non-discriminatory language in both oral and written work.